Lorna O'Donnell

Ellen OCarroll

PhD, Trinity College, Dublin, 2012
Dip. Environmental Impact Assessment Management, University College Dublin, 2003
MA, Archaeological Methods and Practices, University College Cork 1994
BA (Hons), Archaeology and History, University College Dublin, 1991

 

Member

Institute of Archaeologists of Ireland (IAI)
Association for Environmental Archaeology (AEA)
Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland
Irish Quaternary Research Association (IQUA)
Irish Wood Anatomists Association (IWAA)

E-mail:  eocarro@tcd.ie
Phone +353-86-8241753

Expertise

  • Wood and charcoal identifications
  • Wood analysis and reporting on worked wood and wooden artefacts
  • General advice for wood and charcoal sampling strategies on archaeological excavations to produce the most informative data set for further analysis and later publications
  • Pollen and microfossil studies including macroscopic charcoal in relation to vegetation reconstructions and human dynamics.

 

I graduated from University College Dublin in 1991 with a BA Honours degree in Celtic archaeology. After working on various wetland excavations with the Irish Archaeological Wetland Unit I became interested in wood identifications and wood use as well as research investigations towards woodland reconstructions and woodland management. In 1994 I completed an MA in archaeological methods and practices from University College Cork. My thesis was on ‘’The Analysis of Two Wooden Assemblages from Corlea bog Co. Longford and King John's Castle Co. Limerick." Since 1994 I have worked on various excavations and research projects as well as completing many environmental reports associated with the analysis of charcoal and wood as well as wooden artefacts from archaeological excavations. What stood out to me was the sheer narrowness of the rolex replica uk coupled with the tight turns throughout. Biver is known for making his own cheeses so it no surprise that this cheesy sauce battle took place. I am replica watches entirely sure who won, but I believe watches store took this one. In a time when there is uncertainty in the industry and a vast swath of rolex submariner replica for buyers, especially in this price range, both of these timepieces stand out and outclass many similarly priced offerings. That about it for branding on the watch, which is refreshingly subtle considering rolex replica with a racing team titled after an energy drink. The two are basically the same apart from some replica watches uk titanium carbide on the base of the pushers and the center of the case. The matte ceramic swiss replica watches is deep and attractive, matching the dial wonderfully.

I was awarded a PhD in 2012 on ‘Quantifying woodland resource usage in the Irish midlands using archaeological and palaeoecological techniques’ under the supervision of Professor Fraser Mitchell at the Botany Department, Trinity College, Dublin.

I have just completed a comprehensive document with Dr. Meriel Mc Clatchie on ‘Guidelines for the retrieval, analysis and reporting of plant macro-remains, wood and charcoal from archaeological deposits, and the use and applicability of pollen analysis for the National Roads Authority.

I am currently part of the environmental research team on the National Museum of Ireland’s ‘Irish Bog Body Project’ co-ordinating as well as undertaking pollen, wood, peat plant macro studies and charcoal research associated with Cashel man, Co. Laois.

 

Publications

OCarroll, E. (forthcoming) Wood analysis from excavations carried out at Kilbegly watermill, Co. Galway. In Archaeological excavations at Kilbegly, Co. Galway, NRA Monograph Series.
OCarroll, E. and Mitchell, F. J. C., (2012) Charcoal sample guidelines. New methodological approaches towards the quantification and identification of charcoal samples retrieved from archaeological sites. in E. Badal, Y. Carrión, M. Macias, and M. Ntinou, editors. Sagvntvm: Wood and charcoal. Evidences for human and natural History. Departament de Prehistoria i Arqueologia, Univerisitat de Valencia, Valencia.
OCarroll, E. (2012) An Iron Age ring-ditch and environmental remains at Coolbeg townland, Ballynagran, Co. Wicklow In Corlett C. and Potterton, M. editors. Death and Burial in Iron Age Ireland in the light of recent archaeological excavations. Wordwell, Dublin.
OCarroll, E. (2011) Vegetation dynamics of South Sligo and North Roscommon. In Stefanini B. S. and McGlynn, G. editors. North Meath, IQUA Field Guide No. 29. Irish Quaternary Association, Dublin.
OCarroll, E. (2011) Wood Remains. In: Cleary, R and Kelleher, H. editors. Archaeological Excavations at Tullahedy, County Tipperary Neolithic. Settlement in North Munster Cork: Collins Press.
OCarroll, E. and F. Mitchell. 2011. Methodological approaches towards the quantification and identification of charcoal samples retrieved from archaeological sites. PSagvntvm, Papeles del laboratorio de arqueología de Valencia 5th International meeting of charcoal analysis the charcoal as cultural and biological heritage. 11:25-27.
OCarroll, E. & Whitaker J. (2009) Peatland Excavations 1999-2000: Lemanaghan Excavations. Wordwell Ltd., Bray.
OCarroll, E. (2001). The Archaeology of Lemanaghan – the story of an Irish Bog, Wordwell, Bray, Co. Wicklow.
OCarroll, E. (2001) An Analysis of Archaeological Wood found in Irish bogs, pp. 27-35. In B. Raftery & J. Hickey (eds.) Recent Developments in Wetland Research. Seandálaíocht: Monograph 2, Department of Archaeology, UCD and WARP Occasional Paper 14, Dublin.
OCarroll, E and Mc Dermott, C (1997). Recently Identified Archaeological Sites in Lemanaghan Works, Co. Offaly.  In The Quaternary of the Irish Midlands, Irish Quaternary Association, Dublin.
Moloney, A., Bermingham, N., Keane, M. McDermott, C. & OCarroll, E. (1995) Blackwater Survey & Excavations, Artefact Deterioration in Peatlands, Lough More, Co. Mayo. Transactions of the Irish Archaeological Wetland Unit 4. Crannóg Publications, Dublin.
OCarroll, E. (1999). A Trek through the bogs in Co. Offaly. Archaeology Ireland. 13, No. 49.
OCarroll, E. (1999). Archaeological Excavations in Lemanaghan, Co. Offaly. Sceal na Mona. 13, Number 27.