Penny Johnston

Penny Johnston MSc

MA in Electronic Communication and Publishing, University College London, 2012
MSc, Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy, University of Sheffield, 1998
BA, History and Archaeology, National University of Ireland, University College Cork, 1995

Member

Irish Archaeobotanical Discussion Group (IADG)
Institute of Archaeologists of Ireland (IAI)

E-mail: pennyjohnston@ipean.ie
Phone: +353-86-3963652

Expertise

  • Archaeobotany

Biography

I have worked as an archaeobotanist within the context of Irish commercial archaeology since the late 1990s, examining a wide range of material dating from the Mesolithic to the post-medieval period. I also had the good fortune to spend part of five summer excavation seasons (between 1997 and 2002) working as a research assistant with Mick Monk in Novgorod, Russia and looking at the waterlogged plant remains from this medieval city. My main interests are in charred plant remains and the ways these are used to answer (or raise) archaeological questions.

 

Publications


Monk, M. and Johnston, P. (2012) Perspectives on non-wood plants in the sampled assemblage from the Troitsky excavations in medieval Novgorod. In M. Brisbane, N. Makarov and E. Nosov (Eds.) The Archaeology of Medieval Novgorod in Context: studies in centre/periphery relations. Oxford, Oxbow Books.
Johnston, P. (2010) Crop remains from Ballynamona 2, Seanda 5, 14–15.
Johnston, P. (2010) Appendix 2.IV–Analysis of the plant remains from Ballywillin Crannog, pp. 85–86. In C. Fredengren, A. Kilfeather and I. Stuijts Lough Kinale: studies of an Irish lake. Lake Settlement project Discovery Programme Monograph No. 8. Wordwell, Dublin.
Dillon, M. & Johnston, P. (2009) Plant remains, pp. 101–111. In C. Baker The Archaeology of Killeen Castle, Co. Meath. Wordwell, Dublin.
Johnston, P., O'Donnell, L & Margaret Gowen and Co. Ltd. (2008) Appendix V. Analysis of charred plant remains and charcoal, pp. 138–148. In G. Stout and M. Stout Excavation of an Early medieval Secular Cemetery at Knowth Site M, County Meath. Wordwell, Dublin.
Johnston, P. (2007) Appendix IV. Analysis of plant remains, pp. 122–124. In C. Baker Excavations at Cloncowan II, Co. Meath, Journal of Irish Archaeology  XVI, 61–132.
Johnston, P. (2007) Charred seeds from Knockhouse Lower, Co. Waterford (03E1033), pp. 14–15. In A. Richardson & P. Johnston Excavations of a Middle Bronze Age enclosed settlement site at Knockhouse Lower, Co. Waterford (03E1033), Decies 63, 1–7.
Dillon, M., Johnston, P. & Tierney, M. (2007) Charred plant remains from two ringforts in Co. Galway, Seanda 2, 27–29.
Johnston, P. & Reilly E. (2007) Plant and insect remains, pp. 55–62. In A. O'Sullivan, R. Sands, & E.P. Kelly Coolure Demesne crannog: an introduction to its archaeology and landscapes. Wordwell, Bray.
Johnston, P. (2007) Analysis of carbonised plant remains, pp. 70–79. In E. Grogan, L. O’Donnell & P. Johnston The Bronze Age Landscapes of the Pipeline to the West: An integrated archaeological and environmental assessment. Wordwell, Bray.
Johnston, P. (2006) Plant remains, pp. 10–11. In G. Hull Excavation of a Bronze Age round-house at Knockdomny, Co. Westmeath, Journal of Irish Archaeology  XV, 1–14.
Johnston, P. (2006) Appendix 3. In M. McQuade Archaeological excavation of prehistoric settlement sites at Knockhouse Lower and Carrickpherish, Co. Waterford, Decies 62, 21–48.
Johnston, P. (2005) Appendix III Analysis of environmental remains, pp. 66–69. In I. Doyle Excavation of a prehistoric ring-barrow at Kilmahuddrick, Clondalkin, Dublin,  Journal of Irish Archaeology  XIV, 43–75.
Johnston, P. (2004) Macrofossil Plant Remains, pp. 59–67. In E. O’Donovan Excavations at Friar Street, Cashel: a story of urban settlement, Tipperary Historical Journal 2004, 3–90.
Johnston, P. (2003/4) Appendix I Plant Remains, p. 17. In E. O’Donovan A Neolithic House at Kishoge, Co.Dublin, Journal of Irish Archaeology  XII & XIII, 1–27.
Monk, M. & Johnston, P. (2001) Plants, people and environment: a report on the macro-plant remains within the deposits from Troitsky Site XI in medieval Novgorod, pp. 113–117. In M. Brisbane and D. Gamister (eds.) Novgorod: the archaeology of a Russian medieval city and its hinterland. London, The British Museum Occasional Papers, No. 141.

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